Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
21 news outlets
blogs
19 blogs
twitter
442 tweeters
facebook
85 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
8 Google+ users
reddit
8 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
353 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1221635110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert B. Jackson, Avner Vengosh, Thomas H. Darrah, Nathaniel R. Warner, Adrian Down, Robert J. Poreda, Stephen G. Osborn, Kaiguang Zhao, Jonathan D. Karr, Jackson RB, Vengosh A, Darrah TH, Warner NR, Down A, Poreda RJ, Osborn SG, Zhao K, Karr JD, R. B. Jackson, A. Vengosh, T. H. Darrah, N. R. Warner, A. Down, R. J. Poreda, S. G. Osborn, K. Zhao, J. D. Karr

Abstract

Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing are transforming energy production, but their potential environmental effects remain controversial. We analyzed 141 drinking water wells across the Appalachian Plateaus physiographic province of northeastern Pennsylvania, examining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells. Methane was detected in 82% of drinking water samples, with average concentrations six times higher for homes <1 km from natural gas wells (P = 0.0006). Ethane was 23 times higher in homes <1 km from gas wells (P = 0.0013); propane was detected in 10 water wells, all within approximately 1 km distance (P = 0.01). Of three factors previously proposed to influence gas concentrations in shallow groundwater (distances to gas wells, valley bottoms, and the Appalachian Structural Front, a proxy for tectonic deformation), distance to gas wells was highly significant for methane concentrations (P = 0.007; multiple regression), whereas distances to valley bottoms and the Appalachian Structural Front were not significant (P = 0.27 and P = 0.11, respectively). Distance to gas wells was also the most significant factor for Pearson and Spearman correlation analyses (P < 0.01). For ethane concentrations, distance to gas wells was the only statistically significant factor (P < 0.005). Isotopic signatures (δ(13)C-CH4, δ(13)C-C2H6, and δ(2)H-CH4), hydrocarbon ratios (methane to ethane and propane), and the ratio of the noble gas (4)He to CH4 in groundwater were characteristic of a thermally postmature Marcellus-like source in some cases. Overall, our data suggest that some homeowners living <1 km from gas wells have drinking water contaminated with stray gases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 442 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 353 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 16 5%
United Kingdom 6 2%
Germany 3 <1%
France 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 319 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 22%
Researcher 73 21%
Student > Master 71 20%
Student > Bachelor 60 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 5%
Other 55 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 95 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 93 26%
Engineering 52 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 12%
Social Sciences 25 7%
Other 45 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 724. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2017.
All research outputs
#2,842
of 7,437,114 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#116
of 43,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39
of 121,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4
of 919 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,437,114 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 43,988 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,931 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 919 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.