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Emergence Flux Declines Disproportionately to Larval Density along a Stream Metals Gradient

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Emergence Flux Declines Disproportionately to Larval Density along a Stream Metals Gradient
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, August 2013
DOI 10.1021/es3051857
Pubmed ID
Authors

Travis S. Schmidt, Johanna M. Kraus, David M. Walters, Richard B. Wanty

Abstract

Effects of contaminants on adult aquatic insect emergence are less well understood than effects on insect larvae. We compared responses of larval density and adult emergence along a metal contamination gradient. Nonlinear threshold responses were generally observed for larvae and emergers. Larval densities decreased significantly at low metal concentrations but precipitously at concentrations of metal mixtures above aquatic life criteria (cumulative criterion accumulation ratio (CCAR) ≥ 1). In contrast, adult emergence declined precipitously at low metal concentrations (CCAR ≤ 1), followed by a modest decline above this threshold. Adult emergence was a more sensitive indicator of the effect of low metals concentrations on aquatic insect communities compared to larvae, presumably because emergence is limited by a combination of larval survival and other factors limiting successful emergence. Thus effects of exposure to larvae are not manifest until later in life (during metamorphosis and emergence). This loss in emergence reduces prey subsidies to riparian communities at concentrations considered safe for aquatic life. Our results also challenge the widely held assumption that adult emergence is a constant proportion of larval densities in all streams.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Chile 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Unknown 50 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Unspecified 8 14%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 13 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 24 43%
Unspecified 14 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 21%
Chemistry 2 4%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2013.
All research outputs
#1,651,465
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,048
of 4,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,490
of 89,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#73
of 251 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 62nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,705 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,548 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 251 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.