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New insights into mechanisms behind miscarriage

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
153 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
247 Mendeley
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Title
New insights into mechanisms behind miscarriage
Published in
BMC Medicine, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-11-154
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisabeth Clare Larsen, Ole Bjarne Christiansen, Astrid Marie Kolte, Nick Macklon

Abstract

Sporadic miscarriage is the most common complication of early pregnancy. Two or three consecutive pregnancy losses is a less common phenomenon, and this is considered a distinct disease entity. Sporadic miscarriages are considered to primarily represent failure of abnormal embryos to progress to viability. Recurrent miscarriage is thought to have multiple etiologies, including parental chromosomal anomalies, maternal thrombophilic disorders, immune dysfunction and various endocrine disturbances. However, none of these conditions is specific to recurrent miscarriage or always associated with repeated early pregnancy loss. In recent years, new theories about the mechanisms behind sporadic and recurrent miscarriage have emerged. Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest a multifactorial background where immunological dysregulation in pregnancy may play a role, as well as lifestyle factors and changes in sperm DNA integrity. Recent experimental evidence has led to the concept that the decidualized endometrium acts as biosensor of embryo quality, which if disrupted, may lead to implantation of embryos destined to miscarry. These new insights into the mechanisms behind miscarriage offer the prospect of novel effective interventions that may prevent this distressing condition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 247 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 238 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 51 21%
Researcher 38 15%
Student > Bachelor 38 15%
Student > Master 32 13%
Student > Postgraduate 17 7%
Other 50 20%
Unknown 21 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 101 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 33 13%
Psychology 7 3%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Other 16 6%
Unknown 33 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2020.
All research outputs
#415,559
of 14,330,165 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#336
of 2,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,833
of 154,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,330,165 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,232 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 154,549 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them