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Involvement of Fathers in Pediatric Obesity Treatment and Prevention Trials: A Systematic Review

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatrics, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
97 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
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Title
Involvement of Fathers in Pediatric Obesity Treatment and Prevention Trials: A Systematic Review
Published in
Pediatrics, January 2017
DOI 10.1542/peds.2016-2635
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip J. Morgan, Myles D. Young, Adam B. Lloyd, Monica L. Wang, Narelle Eather, Andrew Miller, Elaine M. Murtagh, Alyce T. Barnes, Sherry L. Pagoto

Abstract

Despite their important influence on child health, it is assumed that fathers are less likely than mothers to participate in pediatric obesity treatment and prevention research. This review investigated the involvement of fathers in obesity treatment and prevention programs targeting children and adolescents (0-18 years). A systematic review of English, peer-reviewed articles across 7 databases. Retrieved records included at least 1 search term from 2 groups: "participants" (eg, child*, parent*) and "outcomes": (eg, obes*, diet*). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing behavioral interventions to prevent or treat obesity in pediatric samples were eligible. Parents must have "actively participated" in the study. Two authors independently extracted data using a predefined template. The search retrieved 213 eligible RCTs. Of the RCTs that limited participation to 1 parent only (n = 80), fathers represented only 6% of parents. In RCTs in which participation was open to both parents (n = 133), 92% did not report objective data on father involvement. No study characteristics moderated the level of father involvement, with fathers underrepresented across all study types. Only 4 studies (2%) suggested that a lack of fathers was a possible limitation. Two studies (1%) reported explicit attempts to increase father involvement. The review was limited to RCTs published in English peer-reviewed journals over a 10-year period. Existing pediatric obesity treatment or prevention programs with parent involvement have not engaged fathers. Innovative strategies are needed to make participation more accessible and engaging for fathers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 97 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 20%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Unspecified 6 7%
Other 22 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 21%
Unspecified 16 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 18%
Psychology 13 15%
Social Sciences 8 9%
Other 15 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 143. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2019.
All research outputs
#94,572
of 12,943,360 outputs
Outputs from Pediatrics
#685
of 12,328 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,749
of 341,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatrics
#38
of 201 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,943,360 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,328 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 201 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.