↓ Skip to main content

Salivary diurnal cortisol profiles in patients suffering from chronic breathlessness receiving supportive and palliative care services: A cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, May 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Salivary diurnal cortisol profiles in patients suffering from chronic breathlessness receiving supportive and palliative care services: A cross-sectional study
Published in
Psychoneuroendocrinology, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.01.025
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richella Ryan, Angela Clow, Anna Spathis, Nina Smyth, Stephen Barclay, Marie Fallon, Sara Booth

Abstract

Chronic breathlessness is a common source of psychological and physical stress in patients with advanced or progressive disease, suggesting that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation may be prevalent. The aim of this study was to measure the salivary diurnal cortisol profile in patients receiving supportive and palliative care for a range of malignant and non-malignant conditions and to compare the profile of those experiencing moderate-to-severe disability due to breathlessness against that of patients with mild/no breathlessness and that of healthy controls. Saliva samples were collected over two consecutive weekdays at 3, 6, and 12h after awakening in 49 patients with moderate-to-severe breathlessness [Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnoea grade ≥3], 11 patients with mild/no breathlessness (MRC dyspnoea grade ≤2), and 50 healthy controls. Measures of breathlessness, stress, anxiety, depression, wellbeing and sleep were examined concomitantly. The diurnal cortisol slope (DCS) was calculated for each participant by regressing log-transformed cortisol values against collection time. Mean DCS was compared across groups using ANCOVA. Individual slopes were categorised into one of four categories: consistent declining, consistent flat, consistent ascending and inconsistent. Controlling for age, gender and socioeconomic status, the mean DCS was significantly flatter in patients with moderate-to-severe breathlessness compared to patients with mild/no breathlessness and healthy controls [F (2, 103)=45.64, p<0.001]. Furthermore, there was a higher prevalence of flat and ascending cortisol profiles in patients with moderate-to-severe breathlessness (23.4%) compared to healthy controls (0%). The only variable which correlated significantly with DCS was MRC dyspnoea grade (rs=0.29, p<0.05). These findings suggest that patients with moderate-to-severe breathlessness have evidence of HPA axis dysregulation and that this dysregulation may be related to the functional disability imposed by breathlessness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Professor 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 10 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 33%
Psychology 6 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 14%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2020.
All research outputs
#2,375,094
of 15,942,359 outputs
Outputs from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#678
of 3,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,051
of 359,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#22
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,942,359 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,044 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 359,442 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.