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Matching seed to site by climate similarity: Techniques to prioritize plant materials development and use in restoration

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Matching seed to site by climate similarity: Techniques to prioritize plant materials development and use in restoration
Published in
Ecological Applications, March 2017
DOI 10.1002/eap.1505
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kyle D. Doherty, Bradley J. Butterfield, Troy E. Wood

Abstract

Land management agencies are increasing the use of native plant materials for vegetation treatments to restore ecosystem function and maintain natural ecological integrity. This shift towards the use of natives has highlighted a need to increase the diversity of materials available. A key problem is agreeing on how many, and which, new accessions should be developed. Here we describe new methods that address this problem. Our methods use climate data to calculate a climate similarity index between two points in a defined extent. This index can be used to predict relative performance of available accessions at a target site. In addition, the index can be used in combination with standard cluster analysis algorithms to quantify and maximize climate coverage (mean climate similarity), given a modeled range extent and a specified number of accessions. We demonstrate the utility of this latter feature by applying it to the extents of 11 Western North American species with proven or potential use in restoration. First, a species-specific seed transfer map can be readily generated for a species by predicting performance for accessions currently available; this map can be readily updated to accommodate new accessions. Next, the increase in climate coverage achieved by adding successive accessions can be explored, yielding information that managers can use to balance ecologic and economic considerations in determining how many accessions to develop. This approach identifies sampling sites, referred to as climate centers, which contribute unique, complementary climate coverage to accessions on hand, thus providing explicit sampling guidance for both germplasm preservation and research. We examine how these, and other, features of our approach add to existing methods used to guide plant materials development and use. Finally, we discuss how these new methods provide a framework that could be used to coordinate native plant materials development, evaluation, and use across agencies, regions, and research groups. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 75 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 25%
Student > Master 10 13%
Professor 4 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 4%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 45%
Environmental Science 23 30%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2019.
All research outputs
#3,192,037
of 18,812,015 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#846
of 3,002 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,584
of 373,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#23
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,002 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,758 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.