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GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUSES FROM WATERFOWL IN WESTERN ALASKA, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, July 2013
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2 tweeters

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58 Mendeley
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Title
GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUSES FROM WATERFOWL IN WESTERN ALASKA, USA
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, July 2013
DOI 10.7589/2012-04-108
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew B. Reeves, John M. Pearce, Andrew M. Ramey, Craig R. Ely, Joel A. Schmutz, Paul L. Flint, Dirk V. Derksen, Hon S. Ip, Kimberly A. Trust

Abstract

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (Y-K Delta) in western Alaska is an immense and important breeding ground for waterfowl. Migratory birds from the Pacific Americas, Central Pacific, and East Asian-Australasian flyways converge in this region, providing opportunities for intermixing of North American- and Eurasian-origin hosts and infectious agents, such as avian influenza virus (AIV). We characterized the genomes of 90 low pathogenic (LP) AIV isolates from 11 species of waterfowl sampled on the Y-K Delta between 2006 and 2009 as part of an interagency surveillance program for the detection of the H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) strain of AIV. We found evidence for subtype and genetic differences between viruses from swans and geese, dabbling ducks, and sea ducks. At least one gene segment in 39% of all isolates was Eurasian in origin. Target species (those ranked as having a relatively high potential to introduce HP H5N1 AIV to North America) were no more likely than nontarget species to carry viruses with genes of Eurasian origin. These findings provide evidence that the frequency at which viral gene segments of Eurasian origin are detected does not result from a strong species effect, but rather we suspect it is linked to the geographic location of the Y-K Delta in western Alaska where flyways from different continents overlap. This study provides support for retaining the Y-K Delta as a high priority region for the surveillance of Asian avian pathogens such as HP H5N1 AIV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 56 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 26%
Other 13 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Professor 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 10 17%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 14 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2013.
All research outputs
#13,846,366
of 21,514,875 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#1,067
of 1,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,151
of 173,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#12
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,514,875 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,586 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.