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A cell-based computational model of early embryogenesis coupling mechanical behaviour and gene regulation

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
A cell-based computational model of early embryogenesis coupling mechanical behaviour and gene regulation
Published in
Nature Communications, January 2017
DOI 10.1038/ncomms13929
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julien Delile, Matthieu Herrmann, Nadine Peyriéras, René Doursat

Abstract

The study of multicellular development is grounded in two complementary domains: cell biomechanics, which examines how physical forces shape the embryo, and genetic regulation and molecular signalling, which concern how cells determine their states and behaviours. Integrating both sides into a unified framework is crucial to fully understand the self-organized dynamics of morphogenesis. Here we introduce MecaGen, an integrative modelling platform enabling the hypothesis-driven simulation of these dual processes via the coupling between mechanical and chemical variables. Our approach relies upon a minimal 'cell behaviour ontology' comprising mesenchymal and epithelial cells and their associated behaviours. MecaGen enables the specification and control of complex collective movements in 3D space through a biologically relevant gene regulatory network and parameter space exploration. Three case studies investigating pattern formation, epithelial differentiation and tissue tectonics in zebrafish early embryogenesis, the latter with quantitative comparison to live imaging data, demonstrate the validity and usefulness of our framework.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Taiwan 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 93 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 27%
Researcher 22 23%
Student > Master 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Unspecified 9 9%
Other 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 23%
Engineering 11 11%
Unspecified 7 7%
Computer Science 7 7%
Other 22 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,106,932
of 9,752,643 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#8,756
of 16,409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,233
of 317,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#537
of 867 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,752,643 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,409 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.4. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,252 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 867 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.