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Xist-dependent imprinted X inactivation and the early developmental consequences of its failure

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
patent
1 patent
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
189 Mendeley
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Title
Xist-dependent imprinted X inactivation and the early developmental consequences of its failure
Published in
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1038/nsmb.3365
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maud Borensztein, Laurène Syx, Katia Ancelin, Patricia Diabangouaya, Christel Picard, Tao Liu, Jun-Bin Liang, Ivaylo Vassilev, Rafael Galupa, Nicolas Servant, Emmanuel Barillot, Azim Surani, Chong-Jian Chen, Edith Heard

Abstract

The long noncoding RNA Xist is expressed from only the paternal X chromosome in mouse preimplantation female embryos and mediates transcriptional silencing of that chromosome. In females, absence of Xist leads to postimplantation lethality. Here, through single-cell RNA sequencing of early preimplantation mouse embryos, we found that the initiation of imprinted X-chromosome inactivation absolutely requires Xist. Lack of paternal Xist leads to genome-wide transcriptional misregulation in the early blastocyst and to failure to activate the extraembryonic pathway that is essential for postimplantation development. We also demonstrate that the expression dynamics of X-linked genes depends on the strain and parent of origin as well as on the location along the X chromosome, particularly at the first 'entry' sites of Xist. This study demonstrates that dosage-compensation failure has an effect as early as the blastocyst stage and reveals genetic and epigenetic contributions to orchestrating transcriptional silencing of the X chromosome during early embryogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 189 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 187 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 22%
Researcher 35 19%
Student > Bachelor 30 16%
Student > Master 26 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 5%
Other 21 11%
Unknown 26 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 88 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 4%
Computer Science 4 2%
Neuroscience 3 2%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 29 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,573,899
of 17,646,151 outputs
Outputs from Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
#584
of 2,904 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,157
of 367,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
#21
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,646,151 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,904 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 367,220 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.