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Nutritional quality of dietary patterns of children: are there differences inside and outside school?

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, January 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Nutritional quality of dietary patterns of children: are there differences inside and outside school?
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, January 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2016.03.008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diva Aliete dos Santos Vieira, Michelle Alessandra Castro, Mauro Fisberg, Regina Mara Fisberg

Abstract

To describe the dietary patterns of children inside and outside school and investigate their associations with sociodemographic factors and nutritional status. This was a multicenter cross-sectional study in which children of both sexes, aged 1-6 years, attending private and public daycare centers and preschools in Brazil, were evaluated (n=2979). Demographic, socioeconomic and dietary data (weighed food records and estimated food records) were collected. Dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis from 36 food groups. Four dietary patterns were identified inside school, and three outside. Inside school, the "traditional" pattern was associated to low income and presented high nutritional quality. The "dual" pattern was associated with low income and with high intake of added sugar and glycemic load. The "snack" pattern was associated with children enrolled at private schools and with high intake of added sugar and glycemic load. The "bread and butter" pattern was associated with high intake of added sugar and trans fat. Outside school, the "traditional" pattern was associated with high intake of saturated fat, trans fats, sodium, and total fiber. The "bread and butter" pattern was associated with high intake of trans fats and glycemic load, whereas the "snack" pattern was associated with overweight, private schools, high income, and high intake of trans fats, sodium, and total fiber. There are differences in the nutritional quality of dietary patterns inside and outside school, and heterogeneity in adherence to these patterns were observed across regions and socioeconomic classes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 26%
Student > Master 5 15%
Researcher 2 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Professor 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Materials Science 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,871,991
of 12,546,249 outputs
Outputs from Jornal de Pediatria
#225
of 419 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,471
of 338,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Jornal de Pediatria
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,546,249 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 419 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.