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Halitosis: a review of associated factors and therapeutic approach

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Oral Research, August 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 170)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
165 Mendeley
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Title
Halitosis: a review of associated factors and therapeutic approach
Published in
Brazilian Oral Research, August 2008
DOI 10.1590/s1806-83242008000500007
Pubmed ID
Authors

José Roberto Cortelli, Mônica Dourado Silva Barbosa, Miriam Ardigó Westphal

Abstract

Halitosis or bad breath is an oral health condition characterized by unpleasant odors emanating consistently from the oral cavity. The origin of halitosis may be related both to systemic and oral conditions, but a large percentage of cases, about 85%, are generally related to an oral cause. Causes include certain foods, poor oral health care, improper cleaning of dentures, dry mouth, tobacco products and medical conditions. Oral causes are related to deep carious lesions, periodontal disease, oral infections, peri-implant disease, pericoronitis, mucosal ulcerations, impacted food or debris and, mainly, tongue coating. Thus, the aim of the present review was to describe the etiological factors, prevalence data and the therapeutic mechanical and chemical approaches related to halitosis. In general, halitosis most often results from the microbial degradation of oral organic substrates including volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). So far, there are few studies evaluating the prevalence of oral malodor in the world population. These studies reported rates ranging from 22% to more than 50%. The mechanical and chemical treatment of halitosis has been addressed by several studies in the past four decades. Many authors agree that the solution of halitosis problems must include the reduction of the intraoral bacterial load and/or the conversion of VSC to nonvolatile substrates. This could be achieved by therapy procedures that reduce the amount of microorganisms and substrates, especially on the tongue.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 163 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 21%
Student > Bachelor 32 19%
Researcher 18 11%
Student > Postgraduate 13 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 31 19%
Unknown 26 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 93 56%
Chemistry 8 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 3%
Other 16 10%
Unknown 30 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2021.
All research outputs
#6,122,630
of 18,851,697 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Oral Research
#23
of 170 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,813
of 374,035 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Oral Research
#4
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,851,697 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 170 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,035 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.