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Increase in imported malaria in the Netherlands in asylum seekers and VFR travellers

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Increase in imported malaria in the Netherlands in asylum seekers and VFR travellers
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1711-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brechje de Gier, Franciska S. T. Suryapranata, Mieke Croughs, Perry J. J. van Genderen, Monique Keuter, Leo G. Visser, Michele van Vugt, Gerard J. B. Sonder

Abstract

Malaria is a notifiable disease in the Netherlands, a non-endemic country. Imported malaria infections occur regularly among travellers, migrants and visitors. Surveillance data were analysed from 2008 to 2015. Trends in amounts of notifications among risk groups were analysed using Poisson regression. For asylum seekers, yearly incidence was calculated per region of origin, using national asylum request statistics as denominator data. For tourists, denominator data were used from travel statistics to estimate incidence per travel region up to 2012. A modest increase in overall imported malaria notifications occurred in 2008-2015 (from 222 in 2008 to 344 in 2015). Notably, in 2014 and 2015 sharp increases were seen in malaria among travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFR), and in asylum seekers. Of all Plasmodium falciparum infections, most (1254/1337; 93.8%) were imported from Africa; 1037/1337 (77.6%) were imported from Central and West Africa. Malaria in VFR was mostly caused by P. falciparum infection after visiting Ghana (22%) or Nigeria (19%). Malaria in asylum seekers was mostly caused by Plasmodium vivax infection from the Horn of Africa. The large number of notifications in asylum seekers resulted from both an increase in number of asylum seekers and a striking increase of malaria incidence in this group. Incidence of malaria in asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa ranged between 0.02 and 0.3% in 2008-2013, but rose to 1.6% in 2014 and 1.3% in 2015. In 2008-2012, incidence in tourists visiting Central and West Africa dropped markedly. Imported malaria is on the rise again in the Netherlands, most notably since 2013. This is mostly due to immigration of asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa. The predominance of P. vivax infection among asylum seekers warrants vigilance in health workers when a migrant presents with fever, as relapses of this type of malaria can occur long after arrival in the Netherlands.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Master 5 15%
Other 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 50%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2019.
All research outputs
#2,339,274
of 15,797,421 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#606
of 4,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,590
of 358,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,797,421 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,479 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them