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Identification of a large, fast-expanding HIV-1 subtype B transmission cluster among MSM in Valencia, Spain

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, February 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Identification of a large, fast-expanding HIV-1 subtype B transmission cluster among MSM in Valencia, Spain
Published in
PLoS ONE, February 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0171062
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan Ángel Patiño-Galindo, Manoli Torres-Puente, María Alma Bracho, Ignacio Alastrué, Amparo Juan, David Navarro, María José Galindo, Concepción Gimeno, Enrique Ortega, Fernando González-Candelas

Abstract

We describe and characterize an exceptionally large HIV-1 subtype B transmission cluster occurring in the Comunidad Valenciana (CV, Spain). A total of 1806 HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase (PR/RT) sequences from different patients were obtained in the CV between 2004 and 2014. After subtyping and generating a phylogenetic tree with additional HIV-1 subtype B sequences, a very large transmission cluster which included almost exclusively sequences from the CV was detected (n = 143 patients). This cluster was then validated and characterized with further maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses and Bayesian coalescent reconstructions. With these analyses, the CV cluster was delimited to 113 patients, predominately men who have sex with men (MSM). Although it was significantly located in the city of Valencia (n = 105), phylogenetic analyses suggested this cluster derives from a larger HIV lineage affecting other Spanish localities (n = 194). Coalescent analyses estimated its expansion in Valencia to have started between 1998 and 2004. From 2004 to 2009, members of this cluster represented only 1.46% of the HIV-1 subtype B samples studied in Valencia (n = 5/143), whereas from 2010 onwards its prevalence raised to 12.64% (n = 100/791). In conclusion, we have detected a very large transmission cluster in the CV where it has experienced a very fast growth in the recent years in the city of Valencia, thus contributing significantly to the HIV epidemic in this locality. Its transmission efficiency evidences shortcomings in HIV control measures in Spain and particularly in Valencia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Master 3 20%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,803,964
of 9,684,470 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#29,534
of 124,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,912
of 315,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,264
of 5,639 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,684,470 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 124,898 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,639 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.