↓ Skip to main content

Subglacial Lake Vostok (Antarctica) Accretion Ice Contains a Diverse Set of Sequences from Aquatic, Marine and Sediment-Inhabiting Bacteria and Eukarya

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, July 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
34 news outlets
blogs
18 blogs
twitter
288 tweeters
facebook
133 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
49 Google+ users
reddit
4 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
267 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Subglacial Lake Vostok (Antarctica) Accretion Ice Contains a Diverse Set of Sequences from Aquatic, Marine and Sediment-Inhabiting Bacteria and Eukarya
Published in
PLoS ONE, July 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0067221
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yury M. Shtarkman, Zeynep A. Koçer, Robyn Edgar, Ram S. Veerapaneni, Tom D’Elia, Paul F. Morris, Scott O. Rogers

Abstract

Lake Vostok, the 7(th) largest (by volume) and 4(th) deepest lake on Earth, is covered by more than 3,700 m of ice, making it the largest subglacial lake known. The combination of cold, heat (from possible hydrothermal activity), pressure (from the overriding glacier), limited nutrients and complete darkness presents extreme challenges to life. Here, we report metagenomic/metatranscriptomic sequence analyses from four accretion ice sections from the Vostok 5G ice core. Two sections accreted in the vicinity of an embayment on the southwestern end of the lake, and the other two represented part of the southern main basin. We obtained 3,507 unique gene sequences from concentrates of 500 ml of 0.22 µm-filtered accretion ice meltwater. Taxonomic classifications (to genus and/or species) were possible for 1,623 of the sequences. Species determinations in combination with mRNA gene sequence results allowed deduction of the metabolic pathways represented in the accretion ice and, by extension, in the lake. Approximately 94% of the sequences were from Bacteria and 6% were from Eukarya. Only two sequences were from Archaea. In general, the taxa were similar to organisms previously described from lakes, brackish water, marine environments, soil, glaciers, ice, lake sediments, deep-sea sediments, deep-sea thermal vents, animals and plants. Sequences from aerobic, anaerobic, psychrophilic, thermophilic, halophilic, alkaliphilic, acidophilic, desiccation-resistant, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms were present, including a number from multicellular eukaryotes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 288 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 267 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 4%
Brazil 3 1%
Germany 3 1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Other 14 5%
Unknown 223 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 58 22%
Researcher 49 18%
Student > Bachelor 44 16%
Student > Master 40 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 14 5%
Other 45 17%
Unknown 17 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 112 42%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 34 13%
Environmental Science 29 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 4%
Other 33 12%
Unknown 25 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 719. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2020.
All research outputs
#14,688
of 17,630,293 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#255
of 165,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84
of 164,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#7
of 3,945 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,630,293 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 165,953 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,945 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.