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Multigene phylogeny of the Mustelidae: Resolving relationships, tempo and biogeographic history of a mammalian adaptive radiation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, February 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
45 tweeters
wikipedia
20 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
211 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
461 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Multigene phylogeny of the Mustelidae: Resolving relationships, tempo and biogeographic history of a mammalian adaptive radiation
Published in
BMC Biology, February 2008
DOI 10.1186/1741-7007-6-10
Pubmed ID
Authors

Klaus-Peter Koepfli, Kerry A Deere, Graham J Slater, Colleen Begg, Keith Begg, Lon Grassman, Mauro Lucherini, Geraldine Veron, Robert K Wayne

Abstract

Adaptive radiation, the evolution of ecological and phenotypic diversity from a common ancestor, is a central concept in evolutionary biology and characterizes the evolutionary histories of many groups of organisms. One such group is the Mustelidae, the most species-rich family within the mammalian order Carnivora, encompassing 59 species classified into 22 genera. Extant mustelids display extensive ecomorphological diversity, with different lineages having evolved into an array of adaptive zones, from fossorial badgers to semi-aquatic otters. Mustelids are also widely distributed, with multiple genera found on different continents. As with other groups that have undergone adaptive radiation, resolving the phylogenetic history of mustelids presents a number of challenges because ecomorphological convergence may potentially confound morphologically based phylogenetic inferences, and because adaptive radiations often include one or more periods of rapid cladogenesis that require a large amount of data to resolve.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 461 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 2%
United Kingdom 8 2%
Brazil 4 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
India 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 10 2%
Unknown 419 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 104 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 88 19%
Student > Master 62 13%
Student > Bachelor 56 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 28 6%
Other 84 18%
Unknown 39 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 291 63%
Environmental Science 55 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 25 5%
Arts and Humanities 6 1%
Other 14 3%
Unknown 44 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2020.
All research outputs
#639,643
of 16,024,830 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#163
of 1,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,925
of 158,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,024,830 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,369 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,609 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them