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Mercury cycling in agricultural and managed wetlands of California, USA: Seasonal influences of vegetation on mercury methylation, storage, and transport

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, June 2014
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Title
Mercury cycling in agricultural and managed wetlands of California, USA: Seasonal influences of vegetation on mercury methylation, storage, and transport
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, June 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.05.027
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Mark Marvin-DiPasquale, Evangelos Kakouros, Jennifer L. Agee, Le H. Kieu, Craig A. Stricker, Jacob A. Fleck, Josh T. Ackerman

Abstract

Plants are a dominant biologic and physical component of many wetland capable of influencing the internal pools and fluxes of methylmercury (MeHg). To investigate their role with respect to the latter, we examined the changing seasonal roles of vegetation biomass and Hg, C and N composition from May 2007-February 2008 in 3 types of agricultural wetlands (domesticated or white rice, wild rice, and fallow fields), and in adjacent managed natural wetlands dominated by cattail and bulrush (tule). We also determined the impact of vegetation on seasonal microbial Hg methylation rates, and Hg and MeHg export via seasonal storage in vegetation, and biotic consumption of rice seed. Despite a compressed growing season of ~3months, annual net primary productivity (NPP) was greatest in white rice fields and carbon more labile (leaf median C:N ratio=27). Decay of senescent litter (residue) was correlated with microbial MeHg production in winter among all wetlands. As agricultural biomass accumulated from July to August, THg concentrations declined in leaves but MeHg concentrations remained consistent, such that MeHg pools generally increased with growth. Vegetation provided a small, temporary, but significant storage term for MeHg in agricultural fields when compared with hydrologic export. White rice and wild rice seeds reached mean MeHg concentrations of 4.1 and 6.2ng gdw(-1), respectively. In white rice and wild rice fields, seed MeHg concentrations were correlated with root MeHg concentrations (r=0.90, p<0.001), suggesting transport of MeHg to seeds from belowground tissues. Given the proportionally elevated concentrations of MeHg in rice seeds, white and wild rice crops may act as a conduit of MeHg into biota, especially waterfowl which forage heavily on rice seeds within the Central Valley of California, USA. Thus, while plant tissues and rhizosphere soils provide temporary storage for MeHg during the growing season, export of MeHg is enhanced post-harvest through increased hydrologic and biotic export.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 60 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 22%
Student > Master 13 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Professor 4 6%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 27%
Environmental Science 17 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 9%
Chemistry 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2013.
All research outputs
#12,362,053
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#10,855
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,939
of 157,895 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#44
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,895 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.