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Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in feral cats in Qatar

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in feral cats in Qatar
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-0952-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sonia Boughattas, Jerzy Behnke, Aarti Sharma, Marawan Abu-Madi, Sonia Boughattas, Jerzy Behnke, Aarti Sharma, Marawan Abu-Madi

Abstract

Cats are essential in the life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii as they can shed the environmentally resistant oocysts after acquiring infection. Human populations living in cities with high densities of feral cats are therefore likely to be at risk of infection. The current study is the first to estimate the seroprevalence of T. gondii in the feral cat population in Qatar. We investigated the seroprevalence of T. gondii among 495 adult cats from urban and suburban districts in Qatar. Using results from the Modified Agglutination Test, we fitted statistical models with host sex, area and season as explanatory factors and seropositivity as the outcome. The analysis revealed an overall seroprevalence of 82%. Seroprevalence was significantly higher in the summer season (P = 0.006). No significant difference was detected (P > 0.05) between seroprevalence in female and male cats and in cats from urban and suburban districts of Qatar. Despite the seasonal difference, the observed seroprevalence of T. gondii suggests high environmental contamination throughout the year, with some female cats generating more intense responses compared to males. Both findings merit further investigations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Researcher 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 29%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,616,349
of 9,003,777 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#569
of 1,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,251
of 309,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#19
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,003,777 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,397 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,116 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.