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Self-monitoring in hypertension: a web-based survey of primary care physicians

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Human Hypertension, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Self-monitoring in hypertension: a web-based survey of primary care physicians
Published in
Journal of Human Hypertension, July 2013
DOI 10.1038/jhh.2013.54
Pubmed ID
Authors

R J McManus, S Wood, E P Bray, P Glasziou, A Hayen, C Heneghan, J Mant, P Padfield, J F Potter, F D R Hobbs

Abstract

Although self-monitoring of blood pressure is common among people with hypertension, little is known about how general practitioners (GPs) use such readings. This survey aimed to ascertain current views and practice on self-monitoring of UK primary care physicians. An internet-based survey of UK GPs was undertaken using a provider of internet services to UK doctors. The hyperlink to the survey was opened by 928 doctors, and 625 (67%) GPs completed the questionnaire. Of them, 557 (90%) reported having patients who self-monitor, 191 (34%) had a monitor that they lend to patients, 171 (31%) provided training in self-monitoring for their patients and 52 (9%) offered training to other GPs. Three hundred and sixty-seven GPs (66%) recommended at least two readings per day, and 416 (75%) recommended at least 4 days of monitoring at a time. One hundred and eighty (32%) adjusted self-monitored readings to take account of lower pressures in out-of-office settings, and 10/5 mm Hg was the most common adjustment factor used. Self-monitoring of blood pressure was widespread among the patients of responding GPs. Although the majority used appropriate schedules of measurement, some GPs suggested much more frequent home measurements than usual. Further, interpretation of home blood pressure was suboptimal, with only a minority recognising that values for diagnosis and on-treatment target are lower than those for clinic measurement. Subsequent national guidance may improve this situation but will require adequate implementation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 37 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Professor 3 8%
Other 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 54%
Psychology 5 13%
Unspecified 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2013.
All research outputs
#1,788,464
of 7,435,338 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Human Hypertension
#285
of 534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,520
of 122,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Human Hypertension
#3
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,435,338 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 62nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 534 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,113 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.