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Cognitive behavioral therapy increases amygdala connectivity with the cognitive control network in both MDD and PTSD

Overview of attention for article published in NeuroImage: Clinical, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
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12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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108 Mendeley
Title
Cognitive behavioral therapy increases amygdala connectivity with the cognitive control network in both MDD and PTSD
Published in
NeuroImage: Clinical, January 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.01.030
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haochang Shou, Zhen Yang, Theodore D. Satterthwaite, Philip A Cook, Steven E. Bruce, Russell T. Shinohara, Yvette I. Sheline, Benjamin Rosenberg

Abstract

Both major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are characterized by alterations in intrinsic functional connectivity. Here we investigated changes in intrinsic functional connectivity across these disorders as a function of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an effective treatment in both disorders. 53 unmedicated right-handed participants were included in a longitudinal study. Patients were diagnosed with PTSD (n = 18) and MDD (n = 17) with a structured diagnostic interview and treated with 12 sessions of manualized CBT over a 12-week period. Patients received an MRI scan (Siemens 3 T Trio) before and after treatment. Longitudinal functional principal components analysis (LFPCA) was performed on functional connectivity of the bilateral amygdala with the fronto-parietal network. A matched healthy control group (n = 18) was also scanned twice for comparison. LFPCA identified four eigenimages or principal components (PCs) that contributed significantly to the longitudinal change in connectivity. The second PC differentiated CBT-treated patients from controls in having significantly increased connectivity of the amygdala with the fronto-parietal network following CBT. Analysis of CBT-induced amygdala connectivity changes was restricted to the a priori determined fronto-parietal network. Future studies are needed to determine the generalizability of these findings, given the small and predominantly female sample. We found evidence for the hypothesis that CBT treatment is associated with changes in connectivity between the amygdala and the fronto-parietal network. CBT may work by strengthening connections between the amygdala and brain regions that are involved in cognitive control, potentially providing enhanced top-down control of affective processes that are dysregulated in both MDD and PTSD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 107 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 19%
Student > Master 19 18%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Unspecified 11 10%
Other 34 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 39 36%
Unspecified 21 19%
Neuroscience 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Other 13 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2019.
All research outputs
#605,888
of 13,716,038 outputs
Outputs from NeuroImage: Clinical
#64
of 1,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,156
of 347,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age from NeuroImage: Clinical
#8
of 200 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,716,038 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,509 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,390 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 200 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.