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The power metric: a new statistically robust enrichment-type metric for virtual screening applications with early recovery capability

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cheminformatics, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
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Title
The power metric: a new statistically robust enrichment-type metric for virtual screening applications with early recovery capability
Published in
Journal of Cheminformatics, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13321-016-0189-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julio Cesar Dias Lopes, Fábio Mendes dos Santos, Andrelly Martins-José, Koen Augustyns, Hans De Winter

Abstract

A new metric for the evaluation of model performance in the field of virtual screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship applications is described. This metric has been termed the power metric and is defined as the fraction of the true positive rate divided by the sum of the true positive and false positive rates, for a given cutoff threshold. The performance of this metric is compared with alternative metrics such as the enrichment factor, the relative enrichment factor, the receiver operating curve enrichment factor, the correct classification rate, Matthews correlation coefficient and Cohen's kappa coefficient. The performance of this new metric is found to be quite robust with respect to variations in the applied cutoff threshold and ratio of the number of active compounds to the total number of compounds, and at the same time being sensitive to variations in model quality. It possesses the correct characteristics for its application in early-recognition virtual screening problems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 18%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 10 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Computer Science 5 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2017.
All research outputs
#2,903,494
of 12,379,379 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cheminformatics
#248
of 489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,964
of 335,575 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cheminformatics
#12
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,379,379 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 489 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,575 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.