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Why do parents enrol in a childhood obesity management program?: a qualitative study with parents of overweight and obese children

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
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Title
Why do parents enrol in a childhood obesity management program?: a qualitative study with parents of overweight and obese children
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4085-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kamila Davidson, Helen Vidgen

Abstract

Despite the high prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity enrolment to weight management programs remains difficult, time consuming, costly and has limited effectiveness. The aim of this paper was to explore parents' perspectives on factors that influence their decision to enrol in a program to address their child's weight. Semi-structured qualitative telephone interviews were undertaken with 21 parents of primary school aged children above the healthy weight range who had enrolled in a healthy lifestyle program. Questions were developed and analysed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. They addressed parental reasons for enrolment, expectations of the program and apprehensions regarding enrolling. Prior to deciding to enrol, parents tended to be aware of the child's weight status, had attempted to address it themselves and had sought help from a number of people including health professionals. Parental decision to enrol was influenced by their evaluation of their previous attempts and their child's emotional state. Awareness of their child's weight status is an important first step in parents taking action at this health issue however it is unlikely to be sufficient on its own. Parental decision to join a childhood obesity management program can be complex and is likely to be made after numerous and unsuccessful attempts to address the child's weight. Strategies to encourage parents to enrol in programs should include activities beyond awareness of weight status. Health professionals should use contact time with parents to raise awareness of the child's weight status and to provide encouragement to address overweight and obesity. Parents must be supported in their attempts to address their child's overweight and obesity whether they choose to manage it themselves or within a program.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Unknown 104 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 23%
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 15 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 29 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 20%
Sports and Recreations 8 8%
Social Sciences 7 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2017.
All research outputs
#953,191
of 10,290,026 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,208
of 7,651 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,126
of 317,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#38
of 184 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,290,026 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,651 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,321 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 184 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.