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Relationship Between Marital Transitions, Health Behaviors, and Health Indicators of Postmenopausal Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Women's Health (15409996), April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 1,450)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
33 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
17 tweeters
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
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Title
Relationship Between Marital Transitions, Health Behaviors, and Health Indicators of Postmenopausal Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative
Published in
Journal of Women's Health (15409996), April 2017
DOI 10.1089/jwh.2016.5925
Pubmed ID
Authors

Randa M. Kutob, Nicole P. Yuan, Betsy C. Wertheim, David A. Sbarra, Eric B. Loucks, Rami Nassir, Gihan Bareh, Mimi M. Kim, Linda G. Snetselaar, Cynthia A. Thomson

Abstract

Historically, marital status has been associated with lower mortality and transitions into marriage were generally accompanied by improved health status. Conversely, divorce has been associated with increased mortality, possibly mediated by changes in health behaviors. This study uses data from a prospective cohort of 79,094 postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS) to examine the relationship between marital transition and health indicators (blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index [BMI]) as well as health behaviors (diet pattern, alcohol use, physical activity, and smoking) in a sample of relatively healthy and employed women. Linear and logistic regression modeling were used to test associations, controlling for confounding factors. Women's transitions into marriage/marriage-like relationship after menopause were associated with greater increase in BMI (β = 0.22; confidence interval (95% CI), 0.11-0.33) and alcohol intake (β = 0.08; 95% CI, 0.04-0.11) relative to remaining unmarried. Divorce/separation was associated with a reduction in BMI and waist circumference, changes that were accompanied by improvements in diet quality (β = 0.78, 95% CI, 0.10-1.47) and physical activity (β = 0.98, 95% CI, 0.12-1.85), relative to women who remained married. Contrary to earlier literature, these findings among well-educated, predominantly non-Hispanic white women suggest that marital transitions after menopause are accompanied by modifiable health outcomes/behaviors that are more favorable for women experiencing divorce/separation than those entering a new marriage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 6 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 20%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 33%
Psychology 4 13%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 289. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2020.
All research outputs
#47,614
of 14,556,971 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Women's Health (15409996)
#12
of 1,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,324
of 350,212 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Women's Health (15409996)
#1
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,556,971 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,450 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,212 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.