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Results From Ireland North and South’s 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physical Activity and Health, November 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Title
Results From Ireland North and South’s 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth
Published in
Journal of Physical Activity and Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2016-0334
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deirdre M. Harrington, Marie Murphy, Angela Carlin, Tara Coppinger, Alan Donnelly, Kieran P. Dowd, Teresa Keating, Niamh Murphy, Elaine Murtagh, Wesley O’Brien, Catherine Woods, Sarahjane Belton

Abstract

Physical activity (PA) is a key performance indicator for policy documents in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Building on baseline grades set in 2014, Ireland's second Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth allows for continued surveillance of indicators related to PA in children and youth. Data and information were extracted and collated for 10 indicators and graded using an international standardized grading system. Overall, 7 grades stayed the same, 2 increased, and 1 decreased. Grades were assigned as follows: Overall PA, D (an increase); Sedentary Behavior (TV), C-; Physical Education, D-; Active Play, Incomplete/Inconclusive (INC); Active Transportation, D; School, D (a decrease); Home (Family), INC; Community and the Built Environment, B+ (an increase); and Government, INC. Unlike 2014's report card, different grades for the Republic (C-) and Northern Ireland (C+) were assigned for Organized Sport Participation. Although the grade for Overall PA levels increased to a D, this may reflect the increased quality and quantity of data available. The double burden of low PA and high sedentary levels are concerning and underscore the need for advocacy toward, and surveillance of, progress in achieving targets set by the new National Physical Activity Plan in the Republic and obesity and sport plans in the North.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 19%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 24 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 22 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 12%
Social Sciences 7 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 32 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,823,346
of 9,025,009 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physical Activity and Health
#484
of 552 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#256,362
of 309,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physical Activity and Health
#11
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,025,009 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 552 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.