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Intake of Different Types of Fatty Acids in Infancy Is Not Associated with Growth, Adiposity, or Cardiometabolic Health Up to 6 Years of Age

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nutrition, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Intake of Different Types of Fatty Acids in Infancy Is Not Associated with Growth, Adiposity, or Cardiometabolic Health Up to 6 Years of Age
Published in
Journal of Nutrition, January 2017
DOI 10.3945/jn.116.241018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wendy Stroobant, Kim VE Braun, Jessica C Kiefte-de Jong, Henriëtte A Moll, Vincent WV Jaddoe, Ingeborg A Brouwer, Oscar H Franco, Trudy Voortman

Abstract

Studies in adults indicate that a lower saturated and higher unsaturated fat intake is associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. However, studies on fat intake in relation to cardiometabolic health during childhood are scarce. We examined associations between dietary intake of fatty acids (FAs) at age 1 y and measures of growth, adiposity, and cardiometabolic health up to age 6 y. This study was conducted in 2927 children participating in the Generation R Study, a multiethnic, prospective, population-based cohort in the Netherlands. We measured children's total fat intake and intakes of saturated FAs (SFAs), monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs), and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) at a median age of 12.9 mo (95% range: 12.2, 18.9 mo) with a food-frequency questionnaire. We repeatedly measured their height and weight up to age 6 y. At 6 y of age, we measured body fat percentage, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, and serum insulin, triacylglycerol, and HDL cholesterol. These outcomes were combined into a cardiometabolic risk factor score. We examined associations of FA intake with repeated measures of height, weight, and body mass index by using linear mixed models and with cardiometabolic outcomes by using linear regression models, adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors and taking into account macronutrient substitution effects. In multivariable models, we observed no associations of a higher intake of total fat or SFAs, MUFAs, or PUFAs with growth, adiposity, or cardiometabolic health when fat was consumed at the expense of carbohydrates. In subsequent models, there were also no associations observed for higher MUFA or PUFA intakes at the expense of SFAs with any of the outcomes. Results did not differ by sex, ethnicity, age, or birth weight. The results of this study did not support our hypothesis that intake of different types of FAs was associated with adiposity or cardiometabolic health among children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 22%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 22%
Unspecified 4 17%
Social Sciences 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2017.
All research outputs
#3,927,626
of 9,134,189 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nutrition
#2,460
of 4,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,465
of 312,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nutrition
#32
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,134,189 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.7. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,028 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.