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Morbidity and mortality among very preterm singletons following fertility treatment in Australia and New Zealand, a population cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2017
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Title
Morbidity and mortality among very preterm singletons following fertility treatment in Australia and New Zealand, a population cohort study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1235-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alex Y Wang, Abrar A. Chughtai, Kei Lui, Elizabeth A. Sullivan

Abstract

Due to high rates of multiple birth and preterm birth following fertility treatment, the rates of mortality and morbidity among births following fertility treatment were higher than those conceived spontaneously. However, it is unclear whether the rates of adverse neonatal outcomes remain higher for very preterm (<32 weeks gestational age) singletons born after fertility treatment. This study aims to compare adverse neonatal outcomes among very preterm singletons born after fertility treatment including assisted reproductive technology (ART) hyper-ovulution (HO) and artificial insemination (AI) to those following spontaneous conception. The population cohort study included 24069 liveborn very preterm singletons who were admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Australia and New Zealand from 2000 to 2010. The in-hospital neonatal mortality and morbidity among 21753 liveborn very preterm singletons were compared by maternal mode of conceptions: spontaneous conception, HO, ART and AI. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between mode of conception and various outcome factors. Odds ratio (OR) and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. The rate of small for gestational age was significantly higher in HO group (AOR 1.52, 95% CI 1.02-2.67) and AI group (AOR 2.98, 95% CI 1.53-5.81) than spontaneous group. The rate of birth defect was significantly higher in ART group (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.36-2.16) and AI group (AOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.47-6.19) compared to spontaneous group. Singletons following ART had 43% increased odds of necrotizing enterocolitis (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 1.04-1.97) and 71% increased odds of major surgery (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.37-2.13) compared to singletons conceived spontaneously. Other birth and NICU outcomes were not different among the comparison groups. Compared to the spontaneous conception group, risk of congenital abnormality significantly increases after ART and AI; the risk of morbidities increases after ART, HO and AI. Preconception planning should include comprehensive information about the benefits and risks of fertility treatment on the neonatal outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 11 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 9 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,468,769
of 9,222,312 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,239
of 1,870 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,441
of 313,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#49
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,222,312 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,870 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,476 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.