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Population viability at extreme sex-ratio skews produced by temperature-dependent sex determination

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
14 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
88 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
173 Mendeley
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Title
Population viability at extreme sex-ratio skews produced by temperature-dependent sex determination
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, February 2017
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2016.2576
Pubmed ID
Authors

Graeme C. Hays, Antonios D. Mazaris, Gail Schofield, Jacques-Olivier Laloë

Abstract

For species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) there is the fear that rising temperatures may lead to single-sex populations and population extinction. We show that for sea turtles, a major group exhibiting TSD, these concerns are currently unfounded but may become important under extreme climate warming scenarios. We show how highly female-biased sex ratios in developing eggs translate into much more balanced operational sex ratios so that adult male numbers in populations around the world are unlikely to be limiting. Rather than reducing population viability, female-biased offspring sex ratios may, to some extent, help population growth by increasing the number of breeding females and hence egg production. For rookeries across the world (n = 75 sites for seven species), we show that extreme female-biased hatchling sex ratios do not compromise population size and are the norm, with a tendency for populations to maximize the number of female hatchlings. Only at extremely high incubation temperature does high mortality within developing clutches threaten sea turtles. Our work shows how TSD itself is a robust strategy up to a point, but eventually high mortality and female-only hatchling production will cause extinction if incubation conditions warm considerably in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 173 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 172 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 39 23%
Student > Master 27 16%
Researcher 23 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 11%
Student > Postgraduate 8 5%
Other 26 15%
Unknown 31 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 38%
Environmental Science 32 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 9%
Unspecified 6 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 3%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 36 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2019.
All research outputs
#615,702
of 19,282,793 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,714
of 9,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,286
of 376,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#33
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,282,793 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,144 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 376,733 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.