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Characterisation of larval habitats, species composition and factors associated with the seasonal abundance of mosquito fauna in Gezira, Sudan

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, February 2017
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Title
Characterisation of larval habitats, species composition and factors associated with the seasonal abundance of mosquito fauna in Gezira, Sudan
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40249-017-0242-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mostafa M. Mahgoub, Eliningaya J. Kweka, Yousif E. Himeidan

Abstract

Larval source management (LSM), which requires an understanding of the ecology and composition of the local mosquito fauna, is an important parameter in successful vector control programmes. The present study was conducted to understand the distribution of larval habitats, species composition and factors associated with the seasonal abundance of mosquito larvae in Gezira irrigation Scheme in Gezira state, central Sudan. Cross-sectional larval surveys were carried out in the communities of Barakat (urban) and El-Kareiba (semi-urban), in Wad Madani, Gezira. A standard dipper was used for sampling larvae in all possible breeding sites and enamel bowls were employed for larvae sorting. Habitats were characterised using physical features and all larvae specimens were identified morphologically. A total of 331 larval habitats were surveyed, out of which 166 were found to be positive breeding sites for Anopheles (56.78%), Culicinae (29.67%) and Aedes (13.55%) species. A total of 5 525 larvae collected were categorised as Culex (2 617, 47.37%), Anopheles (2 600, 47.06%) and Aedes (308, 5.57%). There was a high number of positive habitats during the rainy season, while the lowest proportion was reported during the hot dry season, in both study sites (Barakat [χ (2) = 10.641, P = 0.0090], El-Kareiba [χ (2) = 23.765, P = 0.0001]). The main breeding site for Anopheles larvae was leaking water pipes (51.5%), followed by irrigation channels (34.2%), hoof prints (6.4%), tyre tracks (5.5%) and water tanks (2.4%). A logistic regression analysis showed that the abundance of Anopheles larvae was reduced by the presence of predators (backswimmers, tadpoles) and grass cover. Adult productivity (number of adult females emerged/m(2)) was not homogeneousfor all habitats; the highest productivity was found in irrigation channels (0.78 females/m(2)) for Anopheles, and in septic tanks (2.86 females/m(2)) for Culicinae and (0.86 females/m(2)) for Aedes. Anopheles arabiensis was found to be the dominant Anopheles species. This study documented the presence of An. funestus in central Sudan for the first time. Maintaining leaking water pipes and adopting intermittent irrigation are recommended for LSM, as these surveyed habitats represent the main source of maintaining the local mosquito population during the hot dry season.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 25%
Environmental Science 7 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 7%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 15 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,882,269
of 9,031,633 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#263
of 346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,931
of 309,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#41
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,031,633 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 346 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,861 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.