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Human and rat gut microbiome composition is maintained following sleep restriction

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
51 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
142 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Human and rat gut microbiome composition is maintained following sleep restriction
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1620673114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shirley L. Zhang, Lei Bai, Namni Goel, Aubrey Bailey, Christopher J. Jang, Frederic D. Bushman, Peter Meerlo, David F. Dinges, Amita Sehgal

Abstract

Insufficient sleep increasingly characterizes modern society, contributing to a host of serious medical problems. Loss of sleep is associated with metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, and neurological and cognitive impairments. Shifts in gut microbiome composition have also been associated with the same pathologies; therefore, we hypothesized that sleep restriction may perturb the gut microbiome to contribute to a disease state. In this study, we examined the fecal microbiome by using a cross-species approach in both rat and human studies of sleep restriction. We used DNA from hypervariable regions (V1-V2) of 16S bacteria rRNA to define operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of the microbiome. Although the OTU richness of the microbiome is decreased by sleep restriction in rats, major microbial populations are not altered. Only a single OTU, TM7-3a, was found to increase with sleep restriction of rats. In the human microbiome, we find no overt changes in the richness or composition induced by sleep restriction. Together, these results suggest that the microbiome is largely resistant to changes during sleep restriction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 51 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 141 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 16%
Researcher 23 16%
Student > Bachelor 18 13%
Student > Master 13 9%
Other 11 8%
Other 41 29%
Unknown 13 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 14%
Neuroscience 17 12%
Psychology 8 6%
Other 27 19%
Unknown 19 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2020.
All research outputs
#561,731
of 14,568,356 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#10,473
of 82,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,319
of 350,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#328
of 913 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,568,356 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,987 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 913 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.