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Multi-functionality of the few: current and past uses of wild plants for food and healing in Liubań region, Belarus

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Multi-functionality of the few: current and past uses of wild plants for food and healing in Liubań region, Belarus
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13002-017-0139-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renata Sõukand, Yanina Hrynevich, Iryna Vasilyeva, Julia Prakofjewa, Yuriy Vnukovich, Jury Paciupa, Aliaksei Hlushko, Yana Knureva, Yulia Litvinava, Siarhei Vyskvarka, Hanna Silivonchyk, Alena Paulava, Mare Kõiva, Raivo Kalle, Renata Sõukand, Yanina Hrynevich, Iryna Vasilyeva, Julia Prakofjewa, Yuriy Vnukovich, Jury Paciupa, Aliaksei Hlushko, Yana Knureva, Yulia Litvinava, Siarhei Vyskvarka, Hanna Silivonchyk, Alena Paulava, Mare Kõiva, Raivo Kalle

Abstract

This study examined the use of wild plants in the food, medicinal and veterinary areas within a small territory limited to one village council in the Liubań district of Belarus. The objectives of the research were to document the current and past uses of wild plants in this region for food and human/animal medication; to analyse the food, medicinal and veterinary areas in the context of wild plants; and to qualitatively compare the results with relevant publications concerning the wild food plants of Belarus. Fieldwork was carried out as a practical part of a development cooperation project in May 2016 in 11 villages of the Liubań district. One hundred thirty-four respondents were selected randomly. Information about local uses of wild plants was obtained via semi-structured interviews and the folk-history method. Interview records were digitalized and the data structured in Detailed Use Records (DUR), which were divided into food, medicinal and veterinary areas and then analysed to ascertain local perceptions. A total of 2252 DUR of wild plants were recorded. Eighty-eight wild plant taxa belonging to 45 plant families were used across all three areas. Of these, 58 taxa were used in the food, 74 in the medicinal and 23 in the veterinary areas. A relatively high percentage of the taxa were used in both the food and medicinal areas (55%) and an even greater percentage in both the medicinal and veterinary areas (87%). Comparison with earlier research on wild food plants shows the considerable difference among seldom-mentioned taxa or uses, showing possible regional differences despite the homogenization of the population during the Soviet era. As the majority of taxa with overlapping uses belonged to the most utilized plants, there appears to be clear a tendency to use plants in several different areas once they are brought into the home. This may be due to the need to maximize the versatility of limited resources. While the number of wild taxa used is relatively high, the mean number of taxa used per person is quite low, which indicates the relatively minor importance of wild plants in the respective areas in the study region. The low importance of snacks signals that unintended contact with nature has been lost.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 16%
Student > Master 6 13%
Other 4 9%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 29%
Environmental Science 6 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 9%
Chemistry 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2017.
All research outputs
#3,884,979
of 9,046,056 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#252
of 518 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,039
of 310,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#8
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,046,056 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 518 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,927 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.