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Hydrologic, land cover, and seasonal patterns of waterborne pathogens in Great Lakes tributaries

Overview of attention for article published in Water Research, April 2017
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Title
Hydrologic, land cover, and seasonal patterns of waterborne pathogens in Great Lakes tributaries
Published in
Water Research, April 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2017.01.060
Pubmed ID
Authors

P.L. Lenaker, S.R. Corsi, M.A. Borchardt, S.K. Spencer, A.K. Baldwin, M.A. Lutz

Abstract

Great Lakes tributaries are known to deliver waterborne pathogens from a host of sources. To examine the hydrologic, land cover, and seasonal patterns of waterborne pathogens (i.e. protozoa (2), pathogenic bacteria (4) human viruses, (8) and bovine viruses (8)) eight rivers were monitored in the Great Lakes Basin over 29 months from February 2011 to June 2013. Sampling locations represented a wide variety of land cover classes from urban to agriculture to forest. A custom automated pathogen sampler was deployed at eight sampling locations which provided unattended, flow-weighted, large-volume (120-1630 L) sampling. Human and bovine viruses and pathogenic bacteria were detected by real-time qPCR in 16%, 14%, and 1.4% of 290 samples collected while protozoa were never detected. The most frequently detected pathogens were: bovine polyomavirus (11%), and human adenovirus C, D, F (9%). Human and bovine viruses were present in 16.9% and 14.8% of runoff-event samples (n = 189) resulting from precipitation and snowmelt, and 13.9% and 12.9% of low-flow samples (n = 101), respectively, indicating multiple delivery mechanisms could be influential. Data indicated human and bovine virus prevalence was different depending on land cover within the watershed. Occurrence, concentration, and flux of human viruses were greatest in samples from the three sampling locations with greater than 25% urban influence than those with less than 25% urban influence. Similarly, occurrence, concentration, and flux of bovine viruses were greatest in samples from the two sampling locations with greater than 50 cattle/km(2) than those with less than 50 cattle/km(2). In seasonal analysis, human and bovine viruses occurred more frequently in spring and winter seasons than during the fall and summer. Concentration, occurrence, and flux in the context of hydrologic condition, seasonality, and land use must be considered for each watershed individually to develop effective watershed management strategies for pathogen reduction.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 20%
Researcher 9 20%
Unspecified 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Other 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 33%
Unspecified 12 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Engineering 3 7%
Other 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2017.
All research outputs
#9,409,152
of 12,269,818 outputs
Outputs from Water Research
#3,979
of 5,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,665
of 334,984 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Water Research
#93
of 134 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 5,590 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.