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Multi-year school-based implementation and student outcomes of an evidence-based risk reduction intervention

Overview of attention for article published in Implementation Science, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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89 Mendeley
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Title
Multi-year school-based implementation and student outcomes of an evidence-based risk reduction intervention
Published in
Implementation Science, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0539-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bo Wang, Bonita Stanton, Lynette Deveaux, Sonja Lunn, Glenda Rolle, Richard Adderley, Maxwell Poitier, Veronica Koci, Sharon Marshall, Perry Gomez

Abstract

Intervention effects observed in efficacy trials are rarely replicated when the interventions are broadly disseminated, underscoring the need for more information about factors influencing real-life implementation and program impact. Using data from the ongoing national implementation of an evidence-based HIV prevention program [Focus on Youth in The Caribbean (FOYC)] in The Bahamas, this study examines factors influencing teachers' patterns of implementation, the impact of teachers' initial implementation of FOYC, and subsequent delivery of the booster sessions on students' outcomes. Data were collected from the 80 government elementary and 34 middle schools between 2011 and 2014, involving 208 grade 6, 75 grade 7, and 58 grade 8 teachers and 4411 students initially in grade 6 and followed for 3 years. Student outcomes include HIV/AIDS knowledge, reproductive health skills, self-efficacy, and intention to use protection. Data from teachers includes implementation and modification of the curriculum, attitudes towards the prevention program, comfort level with the curriculum, and attendance at training workshops. Structural equation modeling and mixed-effect modeling analyses were applied to examine the impact of teachers' implementation. Teachers' attitudes towards and comfort with the intervention curriculum, and attendance at the curriculum training workshop had a direct effect on teachers' patterns of implementation, which had a direct effect on student outcomes. Teachers' attitudes had a direct positive effect on student outcomes. Teachers' training in interactive teaching methods and longer duration as teachers were positively associated with teachers' comfort with the curriculum. High-quality implementation in grade 6 was significantly related to student outcomes in grades 6 and 7 post-implementation. Level of implementation of the booster sessions in grades 7 and 8 were likewise significantly related to subsequent student outcomes in both grades. High-quality initial implementation of a prevention program is significantly related to better program outcomes. Poor subsequent delivery of booster sessions can undermine the positive effects from the initial implementation while strong subsequent delivery of booster sessions can partially overcome poor initial implementation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 89 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 16%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 28 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 15 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 13%
Psychology 10 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 28 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,651,747
of 12,818,194 outputs
Outputs from Implementation Science
#1,015
of 1,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,196
of 343,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Implementation Science
#33
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,818,194 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,338 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,451 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.