↓ Skip to main content

A white man with Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease mimicking lymphoma, preceded by frequent episodes of tonsillitis: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A white man with Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease mimicking lymphoma, preceded by frequent episodes of tonsillitis: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13256-017-1208-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agata Szczurowska, Tomasz Pawlowski, Agnieszka Halon, Anna Skoczynska

Abstract

Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease is a very rare cause of benign lymphadenopathy affecting mainly young Asiatic females. Little is known about the causative agent of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease; however, there are hypotheses of infectious, autoimmune, or hyperimmune background of the disease that have not yet been confirmed in the conducted studies. Frequent episodes of tonsillitis preceding the onset of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease have not been described as yet. A 23-year-old white man with a history of over 20 episodes of tonsillitis in the preceding 2 years was admitted to our hospital because of cervical unilateral lymphadenopathy, fever, night sweating, weight loss, and fatigue. On admission, slight tenderness of cervical lymph nodes and asymmetric palate tonsil enlargement were noted. Owing to the patient's general symptoms and history of malignancy in his close family, a malignant disease such as lymphoma was suspected. Histopathological examination of the excised lymph node revealed areas of coagulative necrosis with abundant karyorrhectic debris, with histiocytes and lymphocytes observed at the margins of the necrotic areas. The microscopic examination led to an unexpected diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease. The patient was treated symptomatically. All of the patient's symptoms, excluding tonsil enlargement, retreated within 2 months. In the differential diagnosis of cervical lymphadenopathy in patients with frequent episodes of tonsillitis, Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease should be taken into account. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease may convincingly mimic symptoms characteristic of lymphoma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 10%
Unknown 5 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2017.
All research outputs
#8,722,661
of 11,330,364 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#835
of 1,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#213,325
of 324,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#32
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,330,364 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,684 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.