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Microgeographical structure in the major Neotropical malaria vector Anopheles darlingi using microsatellites and SNP markers

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, February 2017
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Title
Microgeographical structure in the major Neotropical malaria vector Anopheles darlingi using microsatellites and SNP markers
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-017-2014-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melina Campos, Jan E. Conn, Diego Peres Alonso, Joseph M. Vinetz, Kevin J. Emerson, Paulo Eduardo Martins Ribolla

Abstract

In recent decades, throughout the Amazon Basin, landscape modification contributing to profound ecological change has proceeded at an unprecedented rate. Deforestation that accompanies human activities can significantly change aspects of anopheline biology, though this may be site-specific. Such local changes in anopheline biology could have a great impact on malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate population genetics of the main malaria vector in Brazil, Anopheles darlingi, from a microgeographical perspective. Microsatellites and ddRADseq-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to assess levels of population genetic structuring among mosquito populations from two ecologically distinctive agricultural settlements (~60 km apart) and a population from a distant (~700 km) urban setting in the western Amazon region of Brazil. Significant microgeographical population differentiation was observed among Anopheles darlingi populations via both model- and non-model-based analysis only with the SNP dataset. Microsatellites detected moderate differentiation at the greatest distances, but were unable to differentiate populations from the two agricultural settlements. Both markers showed low polymorphism levels in the most human impacted sites. At a microgeographical scale, signatures of genetic heterogeneity and population divergence were evident in Anopheles darlingi, possibly related to local environmental anthropic modification. This divergence was observed only when using high coverage SNP markers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Student > Master 10 21%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,382,948
of 9,070,122 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,175
of 2,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,682
of 315,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#51
of 146 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,070,122 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,604 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 146 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.