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Safe and Effective Sarcoma Therapy through Bispecific Targeting of EGFR and uPAR

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 3,862)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
54 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
82 Mendeley
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Title
Safe and Effective Sarcoma Therapy through Bispecific Targeting of EGFR and uPAR
Published in
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, May 2017
DOI 10.1158/1535-7163.mct-16-0637
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonella Borgatti, Joseph S. Koopmeiners, Aaron L. Sarver, Amber L. Winter, Kathleen Stuebner, Deborah Todhunter, Anthony E. Rizzardi, Jonathan C. Henriksen, Stephen Schmechel, Colleen L. Forster, Jong-Hyuk Kim, Jerry Froelich, Jillian Walz, Michael S. Henson, Matthew Breen, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, Felix Oh, Kristy Pilbeam, Jaime F. Modiano, Daniel A. Vallera

Abstract

Sarcomas differ from carcinomas in their mesenchymal origin. Therapeutic advancements have come slowly so alternative drugs and models are urgently needed. These studies report a new drug for sarcomas that simultaneously targets both tumor and tumor neovasculature. eBAT is a bispecific angiotoxin consisting of truncated, deimmunized Pseudomonas exotoxin fused to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and the amino terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase. Here, we study the drug in an in vivo "ontarget" companion dog trial since eBAT effectively kills canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) and human sarcoma cells in vitro. We reasoned the model has value due to the common occurrence of spontaneous sarcomas in dogs and a limited lifespan allowing for rapid accrual and data collection. Splenectomized dogs with minimal residual disease were given one cycle of eBAT followed by adjuvant doxorubicin in an adaptive dose-finding, phase I-II study of 23 dogs with spontaneous, stage I-II, splenic HSA. eBAT improved 6-month survival from <40% in a comparison population to ~70% in dogs treated at a biologically active dose (50 µg/kg). Six dogs were long-term survivors, living >450 days. eBAT abated expected toxicity associated with EGFR-targeting, a finding supported by mouse studies. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and EGFR are targets for human sarcomas, so thorough evaluation is crucial for validation of the dog model. Thus, we validated these markers for human sarcoma targeting in the study of 212 human and 97 canine sarcoma samples. Our results support further translation of eBAT for human patients with sarcomas and perhaps other EGFR-expressing malignancies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 13 16%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Other 21 26%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 24 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Unspecified 3 4%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 15 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 428. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2022.
All research outputs
#54,639
of 22,832,057 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
#8
of 3,862 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,403
of 310,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
#1
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,832,057 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,862 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,214 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.