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Hard Exercise, Affect Lability, and Personality Among Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa

Overview of attention for article published in Eating Behaviors, July 2013
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Title
Hard Exercise, Affect Lability, and Personality Among Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa
Published in
Eating Behaviors, July 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2013.07.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa M. Brownstone, Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft, Stephen A. Wonderlich, Thomas E. Joiner, Daniel Le Grange, James E. Mitchell, Scott J. Crow, Carol B. Peterson, Ross D. Crosby, Marjorie H. Klein, Anna M. Bardone-Cone

Abstract

The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help in the context of intense, fluctuating affect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Unknown 36 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 32%
Student > Master 6 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Researcher 6 16%
Professor 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2013.
All research outputs
#3,070,365
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from Eating Behaviors
#256
of 345 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,691
of 90,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Eating Behaviors
#7
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 345 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 90,590 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.