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Starting slow: The effects of response-switching frequency on patterns of cardiovascular reactivity

Overview of attention for article published in Psychology, Health & Medicine, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
Starting slow: The effects of response-switching frequency on patterns of cardiovascular reactivity
Published in
Psychology, Health & Medicine, January 2011
DOI 10.1080/13548506.2010.525655
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Moriarty, Michael Hogan, Ian Stewart

Abstract

Research findings suggest that switching between competing response sets can be resource demanding. The current study focused on concurrent health-relevant physiological effects of task switching by assessing cardiovascular response at varying levels of switch frequency. The participants performed a response-switching task at three different levels of response set switching frequency (low, medium and high) while measurements of blood pressure and heart rate were taken. One group was exposed to response-switching frequency conditions in the order low → medium → high, while the other group was exposed to the same task conditions in the reverse order (i.e. high → medium → low). The results showed that the participants in the low → medium → high switch frequency group recovered faster from initially heightened systolic blood pressure when compared with participants in the high → medium → low group. It is concluded that the results point to a physiological "carry over" effect associated with beginning a task at rapid response switching frequency levels, and suggest the importance of habituation to task demands as a means of offsetting potentially unhealthy levels of reactivity. Implications for modern work environments are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 10%
Unknown 9 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 20%
Student > Master 1 10%
Lecturer 1 10%
Other 2 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 60%
Unspecified 3 30%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2018.
All research outputs
#4,015,536
of 13,935,576 outputs
Outputs from Psychology, Health & Medicine
#156
of 551 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,984
of 156,221 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychology, Health & Medicine
#3
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,935,576 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 551 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 156,221 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.