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Considerations on BVD eradication for the Irish livestock industry

Overview of attention for article published in Irish Veterinary Journal, October 2011
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Title
Considerations on BVD eradication for the Irish livestock industry
Published in
Irish Veterinary Journal, October 2011
DOI 10.1186/2046-0481-64-12
Pubmed ID
Authors

Damien J Barrett, Simon J More, David A Graham, Joe O'Flaherty, Michael L Doherty, H Michael Gunn

Abstract

Animal Health Ireland has produced clear guidelines for the control of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea (BVD) infection in Irish cattle herds. In the course of developing these guidelines it was clear that a framework for regional and/or national BVD control would be required to increase the uptake of BVD control at farm level and reduce the overall prevalence of the disease. This paper assessed the economic impact of BVD, epidemiological aspects of the disease to its control, models of BVD control, international experiences of BVD control programmes. The technical knowledge and test technology exists to eradicate BVD. Indeed, many countries have successfully and others are embarking on control of the disease. The identification and prompt elimination of PI cattle will form the basis of any control programme. The trade of such animals must be curtailed. Pregnant and potentially pregnant carrying PI foetuses pose a significant threat. International experience indicates systematic, well coordinated programmes have the most success, while voluntary programmes can make good initial progress but ultimately fail. The farming community must buy into any proposed programme, and without their support, failure is likely. To buy into the programme and create such a demand for BVD control, farmers must first be well informed. It is likely that stemming economic loss and improving productivity will be the primary motivator at individual farm level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 53 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 22%
Unspecified 5 8%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2013.
All research outputs
#9,954,251
of 12,434,464 outputs
Outputs from Irish Veterinary Journal
#99
of 146 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,202
of 151,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Irish Veterinary Journal
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,464 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 146 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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