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Above-ground biomass and structure of 260 African tropical forests

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
165 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
447 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Above-ground biomass and structure of 260 African tropical forests
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2013
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2012.0295
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon L. Lewis, Bonaventure Sonké, Terry Sunderland, Serge K. Begne, Gabriela Lopez-Gonzalez, Geertje M. F. van der Heijden, Oliver L. Phillips, Kofi Affum-Baffoe, Timothy R. Baker, Lindsay Banin, Jean-François Bastin, Hans Beeckman, Pascal Boeckx, Jan Bogaert, Charles De Cannière, Eric Chezeaux, Connie J. Clark, Murray Collins, Gloria Djagbletey, Marie Noël K. Djuikouo, Vincent Droissart, Jean-Louis Doucet, Cornielle E. N. Ewango, Sophie Fauset, Ted R. Feldpausch, Ernest G. Foli, Jean-François Gillet, Alan C. Hamilton, David J. Harris, Terese B. Hart, Thales de Haulleville, Annette Hladik, Koen Hufkens, Dries Huygens, Philippe Jeanmart, Kathryn J. Jeffery, Elizabeth Kearsley, Miguel E. Leal, Jon Lloyd, Jon C. Lovett, Jean-Remy Makana, Yadvinder Malhi, Andrew R. Marshall, Lucas Ojo, Kelvin S.-H. Peh, Georgia Pickavance, John R. Poulsen, Jan M. Reitsma, Douglas Sheil, Murielle Simo, Kathy Steppe, Hermann E. Taedoumg, Joey Talbot, James R. D. Taplin, David Taylor, Sean C. Thomas, Benjamin Toirambe, Hans Verbeeck, Jason Vleminckx, Lee J. T. White, Simon Willcock, Hannsjorg Woell, Lise Zemagho

Abstract

We report above-ground biomass (AGB), basal area, stem density and wood mass density estimates from 260 sample plots (mean size: 1.2 ha) in intact closed-canopy tropical forests across 12 African countries. Mean AGB is 395.7 Mg dry mass ha⁻¹ (95% CI: 14.3), substantially higher than Amazonian values, with the Congo Basin and contiguous forest region attaining AGB values (429 Mg ha⁻¹) similar to those of Bornean forests, and significantly greater than East or West African forests. AGB therefore appears generally higher in palaeo- compared with neotropical forests. However, mean stem density is low (426 ± 11 stems ha⁻¹ greater than or equal to 100 mm diameter) compared with both Amazonian and Bornean forests (cf. approx. 600) and is the signature structural feature of African tropical forests. While spatial autocorrelation complicates analyses, AGB shows a positive relationship with rainfall in the driest nine months of the year, and an opposite association with the wettest three months of the year; a negative relationship with temperature; positive relationship with clay-rich soils; and negative relationships with C : N ratio (suggesting a positive soil phosphorus-AGB relationship), and soil fertility computed as the sum of base cations. The results indicate that AGB is mediated by both climate and soils, and suggest that the AGB of African closed-canopy tropical forests may be particularly sensitive to future precipitation and temperature changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 447 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 1%
United Kingdom 5 1%
Brazil 4 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Other 8 2%
Unknown 415 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 92 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 88 20%
Student > Master 76 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 29 6%
Other 27 6%
Other 88 20%
Unknown 47 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 164 37%
Environmental Science 151 34%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 39 9%
Social Sciences 5 1%
Arts and Humanities 4 <1%
Other 15 3%
Unknown 69 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2020.
All research outputs
#630,236
of 15,766,637 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#569
of 5,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,187
of 160,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#12
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,766,637 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,218 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,192 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.