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Sex differences in variability across timescales in BALB/c mice

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#41 of 466)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 news outlets
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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47 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Sex differences in variability across timescales in BALB/c mice
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0125-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin L. Smarr, Azure D. Grant, Irving Zucker, Brian J. Prendergast, Lance J. Kriegsfeld

Abstract

Females are markedly underinvestigated in the biological and behavioral sciences due to the presumption that cyclic hormonal changes across the ovulatory cycle introduce excess variability to measures of interest in comparison to males. However, recent analyses indicate that male and female mice and rats exhibit comparable variability across numerous physiological and behavioral measures, even when the stage of the estrous cycle is not considered. Hormonal changes across the ovulatory cycle likely contribute cyclic, intra-individual variability in females, but the source(s) of male variability has, to our knowledge, not been investigated. It is unclear whether male variability, like that of females, is temporally structured and, therefore, quantifiable and predictable. Finally, whether males and females exhibit variability on similar time scales has not been explored. These questions were addressed by collecting chronic, high temporal resolution locomotor activity (LA) and core body temperature (CBT) data from male and female BALB/c mice. Contrary to expectation, males are more variable than females over the course of the day (diel variability) and exhibit higher intra-individual daily range than females in both LA and CBT. Between mice of a given sex, variability is comparable for LA but the inter-individual daily range in CBT is greater for males. To identify potential rhythmic processes contributing to these sex differences, we employed wavelet transformations across a range of periodicities (1-39 h). Although variability in circadian power is comparable between the sexes for both LA and CBT, infradian variability is greater in females and ultradian variability is greater in males. Thus, exclusion of female mice from studies because of estrous cycle variability may increase variance in investigations where only male measures are collected over a span of several hours and limit generalization of findings from males to females.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 25%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Student > Master 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 10 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 10%
Physics and Astronomy 3 5%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2022.
All research outputs
#1,060,670
of 22,619,880 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#41
of 466 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,088
of 397,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,619,880 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 466 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,425 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them