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Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 policy sources
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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111 Mendeley
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Title
Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, July 2013
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12102
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert S. Schick, Leslie F. New, Len Thomas, Daniel P. Costa, Mark A. Hindell, Clive R. McMahon, Patrick W. Robinson, Samantha E. Simmons, Michele Thums, John Harwood, James S. Clark

Abstract

1. Body condition plays a fundamental role in many ecological and evolutionary processes at a variety of scales and across a broad range of animal taxa. An understanding of how body condition changes at fine spatial and temporal scales as a result of interaction with the environment provides necessary information about how animals acquire resources. 2. However, comparatively little is known about intra- and interindividual variation of condition in marine systems. Where condition has been studied, changes typically are recorded at relatively coarse time-scales. By quantifying how fine-scale interaction with the environment influences condition, we can broaden our understanding of how animals acquire resources and allocate them to body stores. 3. Here we used a hierarchical Bayesian state-space model to estimate the body condition as measured by the size of an animal's lipid store in two closely related species of marine predator that occupy different hemispheres: northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). The observation model linked drift dives to lipid stores. The process model quantified daily changes in lipid stores as a function of the physiological condition of the seal (lipid:lean tissue ratio, departure lipid and departure mass), its foraging location, two measures of behaviour and environmental covariates. 4. We found that physiological condition significantly impacted lipid gain at two time-scales - daily and at departure from the colony - that foraging location was significantly associated with lipid gain in both species of elephant seals and that long-term behavioural phase was associated with positive lipid gain in northern and southern elephant seals. In northern elephant seals, the occurrence of short-term behavioural states assumed to represent foraging were correlated with lipid gain. Lipid gain was a function of covariates in both species. Southern elephant seals performed fewer drift dives than northern elephant seals and gained lipids at a lower rate. 5. We have demonstrated a new way to obtain time series of body condition estimates for a marine predator at fine spatial and temporal scales. This modelling approach accounts for uncertainty at many levels and has the potential to integrate physiological and movement ecology of top predators. The observation model we used was specific to elephant seals, but the process model can readily be applied to other species, providing an opportunity to understand how animals respond to their environment at a fine spatial scale.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 107 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 27%
Student > Master 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Other 8 7%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 72 65%
Environmental Science 14 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Mathematics 1 <1%
Other 7 6%
Unknown 11 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#2,298,137
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#787
of 2,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,127
of 166,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#10
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,551 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 166,018 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.