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Zero-gap semiconductor to excitonic insulator transition in Ta2NiSe5

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, February 2017
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109 Mendeley
Title
Zero-gap semiconductor to excitonic insulator transition in Ta2NiSe5
Published in
Nature Communications, February 2017
DOI 10.1038/ncomms14408
Pubmed ID
Authors

Y. F. Lu, H. Kono, T. I. Larkin, A. W. Rost, T. Takayama, A. V. Boris, B. Keimer, H. Takagi

Abstract

The excitonic insulator is a long conjectured correlated electron phase of narrow-gap semiconductors and semimetals, driven by weakly screened electron-hole interactions. Having been proposed more than 50 years ago, conclusive experimental evidence for its existence remains elusive. Ta2NiSe5 is a narrow-gap semiconductor with a small one-electron bandgap EG of <50 meV. Below TC=326 K, a putative excitonic insulator is stabilized. Here we report an optical excitation gap Eop ∼0.16 eV below TC comparable to the estimated exciton binding energy EB. Specific heat measurements show the entropy associated with the transition being consistent with a primarily electronic origin. To further explore this physics, we map the TC-EG phase diagram tuning EG via chemical and physical pressure. The dome-like behaviour around EG∼0 combined with our transport, thermodynamic and optical results are fully consistent with an excitonic insulator phase in Ta2NiSe5.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 22%
Researcher 21 19%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Professor 7 6%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 12 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 77 71%
Materials Science 6 6%
Chemistry 4 4%
Engineering 3 3%
Social Sciences 1 <1%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 15 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,930,793
of 9,076,202 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#12,876
of 15,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,375
of 253,076 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#770
of 873 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,076,202 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,382 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.6. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,076 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 873 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.