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Cerebral white matter hyperintensities on MRI and acceleration of epigenetic aging: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, February 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Cerebral white matter hyperintensities on MRI and acceleration of epigenetic aging: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-016-0302-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abhay Raina, Xiaoping Zhao, Megan L. Grove, Jan Bressler, Rebecca F. Gottesman, Weihua Guan, James S. Pankow, Eric Boerwinkle, Thomas H. Mosley, Myriam Fornage

Abstract

Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are part of the spectrum of brain vascular injury accompanying aging and are associated with a substantial risk of stroke and dementia. We investigated the association of cerebral WMH burden on MRI with a DNA methylation-based biomarker of aging, termed DNA methylation age acceleration, which represents the deviation of the DNA methylation-predicted age from the chronologic age. In this cross-sectional observational study of 713 African-American participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, aged 51-73 years, estimates of predicted age were obtained based on two algorithms (Hannum et al. and Horvath) from DNA methylation measured using the Illumina HM450 array on genomic DNA extracted from blood. Age acceleration, calculated as the residual values from the regression of each of the predicted age measures onto the chronologic age, was significantly associated with WMH burden after accounting for chronologic age and sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, hypertension, diabetes, current smoking, and blood cell composition, and results were similar for either Hannum et al.- or Horvath-derived estimates (P = 0.016 and 0.026). An age acceleration increase by 1 year was associated with an increase of WMH burden by ~1 grade. To shed light on possible biological mechanisms underlying this association, we conducted a genome-wide association study of age acceleration and identified four loci harboring genes implicated in hemostasis, cell proliferation, protein degradation, and histone methylation. However, none of these loci were associated with WMH burden. In this population-based study of middle-aged to older African-American adults, we report an association between accelerated epigenetic aging and increased WMH burden, independent of known risk factors, including chronologic age. Additional studies are needed to clarify whether DNA methylation age reflects biological mechanisms implicated in the aging of the cerebral white matter.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 26%
Student > Master 12 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Other 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 23%
Neuroscience 12 21%
Psychology 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 11 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,751,113
of 9,227,643 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#338
of 484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,658
of 254,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#10
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,227,643 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 484 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,153 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.