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Timing disownership experiences in the rubber hand illusion

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, January 2017
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46 Mendeley
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Title
Timing disownership experiences in the rubber hand illusion
Published in
Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41235-016-0041-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy Lane, Su-Ling Yeh, Philip Tseng, An-Yi Chang

Abstract

Some investigators of the rubber hand illusion (RHI) have suggested that when standard RHI induction procedures are employed, if the rubber hand is experienced by participants as owned, their corresponding biological hands are experienced as disowned. Others have demurred: drawing upon a variety of experimental data and conceptual considerations, they infer that experience of the RHI might include the experience of a supernumerary limb, but that experienced disownership of biological hands does not occur. Indeed, some investigators even categorically deny that any experimental paradigm has been employed or any evidence can be adduced to support the claim that disownership experiences occur during the RHI. It goes without saying that RHI experiences can be elusive, and that there is some evidence to support claims that supernumerary limb experiences can sometimes occur. Here, however, we test the claim that the conscious experience of disownership can occur during the RHI. In order to test this claim, we developed two new online proxies-onset time for the illusion and illusion duration-and combined these with established questionnaires that concern the conscious contents of the RHI, in particular ownership/disownership experiences. Both online proxy data and post hoc questionnaire data converge in supporting the claim that disownership experiences do occur, at least when the left hand is the object of investigation. Our findings that onset time and illusion duration are reliable measures suggest that investigations of the RHI stand to benefit by devoting more attention to data collected while the RHI is being experienced, in particular data concerning temporal dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 26%
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 35%
Neuroscience 9 20%
Engineering 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,725,995
of 11,370,524 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#55
of 74 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,713
of 258,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#10
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,370,524 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.9. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.