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Anatomical integration and rich-club connectivity in euthymic bipolar disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Medicine, February 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

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11 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Anatomical integration and rich-club connectivity in euthymic bipolar disorder
Published in
Psychological Medicine, February 2017
DOI 10.1017/s0033291717000058
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. O'Donoghue, L. Kilmartin, D. O'Hora, L. Emsell, C. Langan, S. McInerney, N. J. Forde, A. Leemans, B. Jeurissen, G. J. Barker, P. McCarthy, D. M. Cannon, C. McDonald

Abstract

Although repeatedly associated with white matter microstructural alterations, bipolar disorder (BD) has been relatively unexplored using complex network analysis. This method combines structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to model the brain as a network and evaluate its topological properties. A group of highly interconnected high-density structures, termed the 'rich-club', represents an important network for integration of brain functioning. This study aimed to assess structural and rich-club connectivity properties in BD through graph theory analyses. We obtained structural and diffusion MRI scans from 42 euthymic patients with BD type I and 43 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Weighted fractional anisotropy connections mapped between cortical and subcortical structures defined the neuroanatomical networks. Next, we examined between-group differences in features of graph properties and sub-networks. Patients exhibited significantly reduced clustering coefficient and global efficiency, compared with controls globally and regionally in frontal and occipital regions. Additionally, patients displayed weaker sub-network connectivity in distributed regions. Rich-club analysis revealed subtly reduced density in patients, which did not withstand multiple comparison correction. However, hub identification in most participants indicated differentially affected rich-club membership in the BD group, with two hubs absent when compared with controls, namely the superior frontal gyrus and thalamus. This graph theory analysis presents a thorough investigation of topological features of connectivity in euthymic BD. Abnormalities of global and local measures and network components provide further neuroanatomically specific evidence for distributed dysconnectivity as a trait feature of BD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Student > Master 8 17%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 20%
Psychology 8 17%
Computer Science 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2017.
All research outputs
#2,978,877
of 15,432,069 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Medicine
#1,323
of 3,955 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,712
of 261,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Medicine
#20
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,432,069 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,955 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.