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Effects of individual, household and community characteristics on child nutritional status in the slums of urban Bangladesh

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Public Health, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 380)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of individual, household and community characteristics on child nutritional status in the slums of urban Bangladesh
Published in
Archives of Public Health, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13690-017-0176-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karar Zunaid Ahsan, Shams El Arifeen, Md. Abdullah Al-Mamun, Shusmita H. Khan, Nitai Chakraborty

Abstract

Bangladesh urban population is expected to overtake rural population by 2040, and a significant part of the increase will be in slums. Wide disparities between urban slums and the rest of the country can potentially push country indicators off track unless the specific health and nutrition needs of the expanding slum communities are addressed. The study aims at describing the individual, household and community determinants of undernutrition status among children living in major urban strata, viz. City Corporation slums and non-slums, in order to understand the major drivers of childhood undernutrition in urban slum settings. Data are derived from Bangladesh Urban Health Survey conducted in 2013. This survey is a large-scale, nationally representative of urban areas, household survey designed specifically to provide health and nutrition status of women and children in urban Bangladesh. Data showed that 50% of under-5 children in slums are stunted and 43% are underweight, whereas for non-slums these rates are 33 and 26% respectively. In terms of severity, proportion of under-5 children living in slums severely underweight or stunted are nearly double than the children living in non-slums. Logistic analyses indicate that mother's education, child's age, and household's socio-economic status significantly affects stunting and underweight levels among children living in the urban slums. Logistic models also indicate that all individual-level characteristics, except exposure to mass media and mother's working outside home, significantly affect undernutrition levels among children living on non-slums. Among the household- and community-level characteristics, only household's socioeconomic status remains significant for the non-slums. Poor nutritional status is a major concern in slum areas, particularly as this group is expected to grow rapidly in the next few years. The situation calls for specially designed and well targeted interventions that take into account that many of the mothers are poorer and less educated, which affects their ability to provide care to their children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 32%
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Lecturer 6 6%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 18 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 17%
Social Sciences 12 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 22 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,210,265
of 13,530,536 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Public Health
#42
of 380 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,378
of 260,003 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Public Health
#5
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,530,536 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 380 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,003 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.