↓ Skip to main content

Using the hierarchical ordinal regression model to analyse the intensity of urinary schistosomiasis infection in school children in Lusaka Province, Zambia

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Using the hierarchical ordinal regression model to analyse the intensity of urinary schistosomiasis infection in school children in Lusaka Province, Zambia
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40249-017-0262-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher Simoonga, Lawrence N. Kazembe

Abstract

Urinary schistosomiasis has been a major public health problem in Zambia for many years. However, the disease profile may vary in different locale due to the changing ecosystem that contributes to the risk of acquiring the disease. The objective of this study was to quantify risk factors associated with the intensity of urinary schistosomiasis infection in school children in Lusaka Province, Zambia, in order to better understand local transmission. Data were obtained from 1 912 school children, in 20 communities, in the districts of Luangwa and Kafue in Lusaka Province. Both individual- and community-level covariates were incorporated into an ordinal logistic regression model to predict the probability of an infection being a certain intensity in a three-category outcome response: 0 = no infection, 1 = light infection, and 2 = moderate/heavy infection. Random effects were introduced to capture unobserved heterogeneity. Overall, the risk of urinary schistosomiasis was strongly associated with age, altitude at which the child lived, and sex. Weak associations were observed with the normalized difference vegetation index, maximum temperature, and snail abundance. Detailed analysis indicated that the association between infection intensities and age and altitude were category-specific. Particularly, infection intensity was lower in children aged between 5 and 9 years compared to those aged 10 to 15 years (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.51-0.99). However, the age-specific risk changed at different levels of infection, such that when comparing children with light infection to those who were not infected, age was associated with a lower odds (category 1 vs category 0: OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.50-0.99), yet such a relation was not significant when considering children who were moderately or heavily infected compared to those with a light or no infection (category 2 vs category 0: OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.45-1.64). Overall, we observed that children living in the valley were less likely to acquire urinary schistosomiasis compared to those living in plateau areas (OR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.16-0.71). However, category-specific effects showed no significant association in category 1 (light infection), whereas in category 2 (moderate/high infection), the risk was still significantly lower for those living in the valley compared to those living in plateau areas (OR = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.04-0.75). This study demonstrates the importance of understanding the dynamics and heterogeneity of infection in control efforts, and further suggests that apart from the well-researched factors of Schistosoma intensity, various other factors influence transmission. Control programmes need to take into consideration the varying infection intensities of the disease so that effective interventions can be designed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 12%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2017.
All research outputs
#6,716,109
of 11,271,704 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#217
of 382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,066
of 259,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#44
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,271,704 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 382 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.