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Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV-1 transmission in France (1999–2014) and impact of targeted prevention strategies

Overview of attention for article published in Retrovirology, February 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

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8 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV-1 transmission in France (1999–2014) and impact of targeted prevention strategies
Published in
Retrovirology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12977-017-0339-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antoine Chaillon, Asma Essat, Pierre Frange, Davey M. Smith, Constance Delaugerre, Francis Barin, Jade Ghosn, Gilles Pialoux, Olivier Robineau, Christine Rouzioux, Cécile Goujard, Laurence Meyer, Marie-Laure Chaix

Abstract

Characterizing HIV-1 transmission networks can be important in understanding the evolutionary patterns and geospatial spread of the epidemic. We reconstructed the broad molecular epidemiology of HIV from individuals with primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) enrolled in France in the ANRS PRIMO C06 cohort over 15 years. Sociodemographic, geographic, clinical, biological and pol sequence data from 1356 patients were collected between 1999 and 2014. Network analysis was performed to infer genetic relationships, i.e. clusters of transmission, between HIV-1 sequences. Bayesian coalescent-based methods were used to examine the temporal and spatial dynamics of identified clusters from different regions in France. We also evaluated the use of network information to target prevention efforts. Participants were mostly Caucasian (85.9%) and men (86.7%) who reported sex with men (MSM, 71.4%). Overall, 387 individuals (28.5%) were involved in clusters: 156 patients (11.5%) in 78 dyads and 231 participants (17%) in 42 larger clusters (median size: 4, range 3-41). Compared to individuals with single PHI (n = 969), those in clusters were more frequently men (95.9 vs 83%, p < 0.01), MSM (85.8 vs 65.6%, p < 0.01) and infected with CRF02_AG (20.4 vs 13.4%, p < 0.01). Reconstruction of viral migrations across time suggests that Paris area was the major hub of dissemination of both subtype B and CRF02_AG epidemics. By targeting clustering individuals belonging to the identified active transmission network before 2010, 60 of the 143 onward transmissions could have been prevented. These analyses support the hypothesis of a recent and rapid rise of CRF02_AG within the French HIV-1 epidemic among MSM. Combined with a short turnaround time for sample processing, targeting prevention efforts based on phylogenetic monitoring may be an efficient way to deliver prevention interventions but would require near real time targeted interventions on the identified index cases and their partners.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Researcher 7 19%
Other 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 7 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2017.
All research outputs
#2,955,712
of 11,603,984 outputs
Outputs from Retrovirology
#138
of 560 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,508
of 259,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Retrovirology
#4
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,603,984 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 560 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.