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The effects of depression and use of antidepressive medicines during pregnancy on the methylation status of the IGF2 imprinted control regions in the offspring

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, January 2011
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Title
The effects of depression and use of antidepressive medicines during pregnancy on the methylation status of the IGF2 imprinted control regions in the offspring
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1868-7083-3-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

A Soubry, SK Murphy, Z Huang, A Murtha, JM Schildkraut, RL Jirtle, F Wang, J Kurtzberg, W Demark-Wahnefried, MR Forman, C Hoyo, Soubry, A, Murphy, Sk, Huang, Z, Murtha, A, Schildkraut, Jm, Jirtle, Rl, Wang, F, Kurtzberg, J, Demark-Wahnefried, W, Forman, Mr, Hoyo, C

Abstract

In utero exposures to environmental factors may result in persistent epigenetic modifications affecting normal development and susceptibility to chronic diseases in later life. We explored the relationship between exposure of the growing fetus to maternal depression or antidepressants and DNA methylation at two differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the imprinted Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene. Aberrant DNA methylation at the IGF2 and neighboring H19 DMRs has been associated with deregulated IGF2 expression, childhood cancers and several chronic diseases during adulthood. Our study population is comprised of pregnant mothers and their newborns (n = 436), as part of the Newborn Epigenetics Study (NEST). A standardized questionnaire was completed and medical record data were abstracted to ascertain maternal depression and antidepressive drug use. DMR methylation levels in umbilical cord blood leukocytes were quantified using pyrosequencing. From the 436 newborns, laboratory data were obtained for 356 individuals at the IGF2 DMRs, and for 411 individuals at the H19 DMRs; about half of each group was African American or Caucasian. While overall no association between depression and methylation profiles was found, we observed a significant hypermethylation of the H19 DMRs in newborns of African American (n = 177) but not Caucasian (n = 168) mothers who reported the use of antidepressive drugs during pregnancy (β = +6.89, p = 0.01). Of note, our data reveal a race-independent association between smoking during pregnancy and methylation at the IGF2 DMR (+3.05%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, our findings suggest a race-dependent response related to maternal use of antidepressants at one of the IGF2 DMRs in the offspring.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Czechia 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 69 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 27%
Researcher 15 21%
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 4 5%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 2 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 22%
Psychology 10 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 12%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 5 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2013.
All research outputs
#11,939,862
of 13,465,271 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#601
of 665 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,642
of 155,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,465,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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