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Postural neck pain: An investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of ‘good’ posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia

Overview of attention for article published in Manual Therapy, November 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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60 Dimensions

Readers on

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223 Mendeley
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Title
Postural neck pain: An investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of ‘good’ posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia
Published in
Manual Therapy, November 2007
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2006.07.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen J. Edmondston, Hon Yan Chan, Gorman Chi Wing Ngai, M. Linda R. Warren, Jonathan M. Williams, Susan Glennon, Kevin Netto

Abstract

Impairments of cervico-cephalic kinaesthesia and habitual forward head posture have been considered important in the aetiology of postural neck pain, yet these factors have not been specifically examined in a homogeneous clinical population. The objective of this study was to compare the habitual sitting posture (HSP), perception of good posture and postural repositioning error (PRE) of the cervico-thoracic (CT) spine in individuals with postural neck pain, with a matched group of asymptomatic subjects. Twenty-one subjects with postural neck pain and 22 asymptomatic control subjects were recruited into the study. An optical motion analysis system was used to measure the HSP and perceived 'good' sitting posture. PRE was measured over six trials where the subject attempted to replicate their self-selected 'good' posture. There was no difference between the groups in the HSP but significant differences were identified in the perception of 'good' posture. Posture repositioning error was higher for the head posture variables than for CT and shoulder girdle variables in both groups. However, there was no significant difference in posture repositioning error between groups for any of the posture measures. The findings suggest that individuals with postural neck pain may have a different perception of 'good' posture, but no significant difference in HSP or kinaesthetic sensibility compared with matched asymptomatic subjects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 223 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Korea, Republic of 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 208 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 65 29%
Student > Bachelor 39 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 12%
Other 15 7%
Researcher 14 6%
Other 63 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 108 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 11%
Sports and Recreations 16 7%
Unspecified 15 7%
Engineering 14 6%
Other 45 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,051,153
of 12,493,082 outputs
Outputs from Manual Therapy
#717
of 1,036 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,766
of 151,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Manual Therapy
#16
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,493,082 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,036 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 151,858 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.