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Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India - the HIVIND study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Research Methodology, March 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
188 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India - the HIVIND study protocol
Published in
BMC Medical Research Methodology, March 2010
DOI 10.1186/1471-2288-10-25
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ayesha De Costa, Anita Shet, Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy, Per Ashorn, Bo Eriksson, Lennart Bogg, Vinod K Diwan

Abstract

Poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has been a public health challenge associated with the treatment of HIV. Although different adherence-supporting interventions have been reported, their long term feasibility in low income settings remains uncertain. Thus, there is a need to explore sustainable contextual adherence aids in such settings, and to test these using rigorous scientific designs. The current ubiquity of mobile phones in many resource-constrained settings, make it a contextually appropriate and relatively low cost means of supporting adherence. In India, mobile phones have wide usage and acceptability and are potentially feasible tools for enhancing adherence to medications. This paper presents the study protocol for a trial, to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first-line antiretroviral treatment in South India.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Australia 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Brazil 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
Sweden 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 174 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 41 22%
Student > Master 40 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 7%
Student > Postgraduate 9 5%
Other 35 19%
Unknown 14 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 73 39%
Social Sciences 22 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 9%
Psychology 16 9%
Computer Science 15 8%
Other 28 15%
Unknown 17 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,833,861
of 11,625,761 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#376
of 991 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,803
of 139,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Research Methodology
#7
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,625,761 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 991 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,667 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.